Sunset and Daybreak – Our Journey Begins

Introducing one of our lucky bloggers for the fall 2016, Thomas Enck will be sharing stories from his program in Salzburg, Austria and all over Europe! Enjoy!

T. Time: I

“May our travels carry us over many seas and to many shores, but may we never let them carry us from who we’re meant to be.”
– W.G.

It’s a strange feeling, having the sunset send you off at the beginning of a flight only to look forward to a warm greeting from the sunrise on the other side. These are the clichés that writers dream about; the ending of a chapter and the beginning of another, entering a new era, so on and so forth.

To tell you the truth I’m still a little peeved with the 5-hour delay that we had at the beginning this flight. And that’s what made the extended allegory possible in the first place.

Ladies and gentlemen, this is the beginning of T. Time – a blog that will cover a small town, Colorado kid gallivanting throughout Europe for 4+ months with good friends new and old. But by no means is he the focal point of these tales.

Obligatory fair warning based on the name: if you were looking for a blog covering the Masters, or Golf, or Bubba Watson’s Oakley Jetpack (it’s a thing – Google it) you have, somewhat regrettably, come to the wrong place.

Currently your guide on this journey is nowhere near any of that. Rather, he is sitting in an Icelandair Jet which happens to be named after Hekla; a volcano that was thought to be the entrance to Hell in the Middle Ages. Charming name, I’m sure you’d agree. Just the plane you would want to fly you over the North Atlantic. That being said, the egregious delay, the temporary annoyance, not even the off-putting reference to the lair of Lucifer where able to match the unbridled curiosity, anticipation and yes, trepidation, of your metaphorical pilot – a man who has never set foot off the North American Continent.

The reason is fairly simple, and it is what we will cover over the next several months. Coming of age in the world in which we live into is an exceedingly difficult. Full of moments of paralyzing fear and insane bravery, insatiable love and inconsolable loss, destabilizing confusion and concrete certainty one after the other. We are expected to know who we are and step into the world fully formed before we ourselves know the answer to so many questions.

Thus we must learn, and to do so we must leap into the unknown. We must experience what life has to offer in the lessons taught by the circumstance around us. Maybe not in an aircraft named after Hell’s gates, but I digress.
I am not an incredible person by any means. In fact, I would say that I am average in most every aspect. But I would love to take you on this journey with me. Within the experiences that we have on a regular basis there is so much to learn.

It would be my pleasure if you would join me – metaphorically of course. The plane wasn’t delayed long enough for you to make it to D.I.A. after this was posted, even if it may have felt as such. The narratives to be told will be cut with humor and hilarity; pondering, questioning, and hopefully minimal pandering. All will be bursting with colorful characters and absurd and thought provoking accounts. Through these stories we can explore what it means to be young – be it literally or the young of heart – in a world that is so full of uncertainties. Dreams, ideals, aspirations and beliefs, all and more will be covered in due time through the medium of experience: across the entirety of Europe no less.

The honor would be mine to serve as your symbolic flight attendant on this journey. You, however, are the protagonist and primary traveler in your odyssey of self-discovery.

Should you choose to join, you have my word that our plane will not be delayed. In fact, we’re ahead of schedule. In addition, you can name the plane whatever you would like – Though may I humbly suggest something mellow, such as Basket of Puppies or Edelweiss. All you have to do is say the word and we’ll come roaring out of the dawn into the unknown.

Who knows. Maybe this daybreak it isn’t just a tired metaphor after all. It could truly be the start of something new; but there’s only one way to find out.

-Your meek conductor and Watchword Guide, T. R. E.

Anticipating Abroad: Hopes, Fears, and Goals

In the two years I have been at the University of Denver, I have found that it is not uncommon for my peers to be remarkably well-traveled. In addition, as DU was recently ranked the #1 school in the country for study abroad, I never hear my peers asking each other if they are studying abroad, but rather where they are studying abroad. I am Emily Wolverton, and this fall I will be studying at the Danish Institute for Study Abroad (DIS) in Copenhagen, Denmark. I narrowed down my destination options with two main criteria: classes taught in English and a program that provided interesting pre-medicine classes. I ultimately decided on DIS in Copenhagen because it met those criteria and includes experiential learning opportunities, has a strong student support system, and integrates travel into the semester via class study tours and independent travel breaks. Frankly, I am terrified for all that is to come. However despite my fears, I am also ecstatic to get the opportunity to learn about a new culture in depth for four months.

My biggest fear stems from my inexperience traveling independently. I love traveling with my family and have taken a few trips with groups of students since attending DU, but never have I set off completely on my own for a foreign country with no companions. I am anxious but also excited to be pushed out of my comfort zone and forced into independence. I rarely go home during the school year at DU, but there is something intimidating about knowing there is an ocean between my family and friends and me, so I couldn’t go home if I wanted.

Another fear is that I won’t achieve the level of cultural immersion for which I am hoping. DIS is a school geared completely toward students (mostly from the U.S.) who are studying abroad. It is an English-speaking school with a lot of support, which is comforting but also a little disappointing. I do not know a word of Danish and will only be taking a beginner language and culture course, so I worry I will not be able to connect with the Danes closely due to this language barrier and the physical separation I anticipate within the school.

bookphotoA third fear I have is that I will get too caught up in my school work to enjoy the fact that I am in a beautiful and unique foreign country. I am looking forward to all of the classes I am registered for, but am worried I will become a little too engrossed in my studies. I want to explore Scandinavia and Europe as a whole, but my education has always been my first priority. I am afraid this personality trait may limit my enjoyment and appreciation of the time I have abroad because I will be so focused doing well in my classes.

Now that I have made studying abroad sound scary and somewhat undesirable, I want to explain some of my hopes and goals for my experience as they are the things that occupy my mind most often as I look forward to the coming semester. My biggest hope is to build lasting relationships. I love exploring and going on adventures, but those experiences are always made better by having people with whom to share them. There are two separate week-long breaks set aside during the semester to allow students to travel, so I hope to find friends with whom I can explore Copenhagen, Scandinavia, and even Europe.

copenhagen_cnt_6nov09_istock_b
This is a famous canal in Copenhagen which I cannot wait to see for myself.

I not only want to get to know my peers and professors, but I also hope to get to know people from Denmark so I may develop a better understanding and appreciation for the country and culture. My goal is for these relationships to remove me from “tourist” status to become a true temporary resident. I hope to really know Copenhagen and feel like it is a second home to me. One thing I think will help me connect best to Copenhagen is working hard to understand the culture and language which is why another goal of mine is to be able to listen to people speaking in Danish and understand the gist of the conversation. Additionally, I hope to be able to go out to eat and order a meal (correctly) in Danish.

One major reason I applied to DIS was the number of outstanding experiential learning opportunities it provides for its students. The classes I have taken for my major in biology and for the pre-med track have undoubtedly been necessary as a foundation for my future education. I have high hopes, however, for the specific medicine-based courses I will be taking in Copenhagen which are accompanied by multiple experiential learning adventures. In my main course, I get to learn how to suture, insert an IV, and more. My goal is to master these skills as they appeal to my interests and are applicable to my career aspirations. The clinical approach to the science of medicine is the root of my interest so I cannot wait to learn how to “write a structured medical report,” and “explain the rationale for choice of tests and treatments in clinical practice,” both of which are course objectives for my main class. My goal in these classes is to excel and to master the skills and knowledge with which I am presented. I chose an academically rigorous program because I love my major and am excited for a future in medicine, so I hope to do well in these classes and affirm my love for the medical field.

Another hope I have (although it is also a fear) is to realize what I am capable of when I am out on my own. I expect to be out of my comfort zone often, but I am excited to gain some independence and develop socially and culturally. I hope to embrace a new lifestyle while abroad and to gain a more worldly perspective.