Gamification! (of study abroad?)

I like games. A lot. I grew up watching my older brothers play video games and I got in on the action with Mario, Zelda, Final Fantasy, Command and Conquer, Age of Empires (we had our own LAN sibling games), Starcraft, and Super Smash Brothers. Nowadays I don’t have a TV, and don’t have a lot of time or money as a student. However, I do have my laptop and the internet; which in my case, translates into playing League of Legends.

Emilie Game1

Favorite Role: Support

Rank: Bronze II

Ward Score: 2391

Most played Champs: Leona, Nami, Thresh

If I was a Champion I would be: Annie- small and super cute. (I even named my teddy bear Tibbers)

So, I like games, but I also like study abroad. A lot. Where do games and study abroad intersect?

What is the biggest barrier to students studying abroad?

The most common answer is finances, but some would argue otherwise. Isn’t the biggest barrier to students the overwhelming feeling they get when the first thing people ask is “where do you want to study abroad?” It is paralyzing to students when especially when they have absolutely no idea. There are thousands of program options to choose from, most don’t know how to even start researching programs, let alone have a program chosen already. ProjectTravel is using game design and gamification to make study abroad more accessible to students.

What is gamification?

Gamification is using game elements and game design to solve problems and engage people. The three basic elements of game design are: onboarding, engagement and progression loops, and rewards; and overall gamification makes it impossible for people to fail.

  • Onboarding-Games include guides, feedback, limited options, and limited obstacles. Emilie Game2
  • Engagement & Progression Loops– our brains love challenges and feedback.
  • Rewards-Compared to extrinsic rewards, intrinsic rewards have longer pay-offs.Emilie Game3

 

Overcoming the Overwhelming Feeling

Instead of starting with a question that belongs in level 10, challenger mode, “where do you want to study abroad,” why not start back at level 1, easy mode: tell me a little about yourself, where you’ve traveled, and what you are studying? ProjectTravel takes it a step further, using game design to limit options, making it easy for student to click their answers instead of having to type in responses. Obstacles are also limited, as ProjectTravel only shows certain information and questions to students that must be completed before they can move on to the next level. Below is a sample of what is asked of students in level 1.

Emilie Game4

We can see multiple examples of game design: feedback through the status bar, rewards, limited options and obstacles. The expectations and information required from students is very clear and understandable, and limited so that students are not overwhelmed from the beginning. After completing Level 1, students are rewarded with a badge and will gain access to a slightly more difficult level.

The majority of students when asked, say that they are interested in studying abroad. According to the Open Doors Report, only 1% of American students actually study abroad. ProjectTravel argues that students are currently so unaware of study abroad programs that they don’t have the opportunity to make a choice. What is the role of the study abroad office? Is the study abroad office responsible for marketing programs to all interested students? If your answer is yes, then perhaps gamification of the study abroad application process is the new best tool to reach out to this generation of students.

– Emilie, Study Abroad Assistant

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