Living with a Host Family

I have now been studying in Alicante, Spain for a month. During this month, I have completed classes, gone on numerous trips around Europe and Spain, and learned a lot of new things. Perhaps the most interesting experience I have had, however, is simply living with a host mother. Now that the awkwardness of living with a complete stranger has passed, I have been thoroughly enjoying the experience.

My host mother’s name is Cristina. She was born and raised in Alicante, Spain. Her first language is Spanish and her second language is French; she does not speak a word of english, making it somewhat difficult to communicate sometimes.

Although sometimes it can be difficult to communicate my exact thoughts to her, my Spanish language skills have drastically increased and things are getting a lot easier. We eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner together, so I am being forced to speak a lot of Spanish in order to maintain fluent conversations.

I have found that I learn much more quickly and effectively here than I do in classes in the United States. I believe this is because I actually need to use it here and rather than filling out worksheets or taking quizzes, I am breaking a language barrier one day at a time.

In addition to my increased language skills, I am getting to experience authentic Spanish cuisine on a regular basis. Cristina is a wonderful cook, and she cooks for both of us everyday. She solely cooks Spanish foods that she would eat on a regular basis which is really nice, plus it is saving me a lot of money.

Staying with a host mom has really allowed me to immerse myself in the culture of Alicante much more rapidly than some of my peers who are staying in apartments with other American students. Although it can be awkward and confusing at times I am loving everything about the experience and would recommend it to anyone who has the opportunity in the future.

 

Granada, Spain

The first official weekend trip of my study abroad experience was to Granada, Spain. I went with the other students in my program, and we took a four-hour bus ride to get to the city.

When asked what the most visited city in Spain is, most individuals would respond with “Madrid” or “Barcelona,” but the correct answer is Granada. Granada is a pretty small city with an estimated 235,000 people living there year round. However, it has quite a large feel and is full of street vendors, art, culture, historic sites, and tapas restaurants.

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The first stop upon arriving to Granada was the Christopher Columbus Museum. Full of historical information and artifacts (such as the hand-written diary of Christopher Columbus), it was incredibly interesting and I would highly recommend visiting.

 

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The second stop was at Granada Cathedral. A massive Cathedral that was finished in 1561 has a very impressive, intricate interior design as seen in these photos. It was built over the cities main mosque after the city was conquered and deemed a Roman Catholic area.

The last historical site that we visited is the most well-known attraction in the city of Granada. We visited El Alhambra. It was originally built as a small fortress in AD 889, but after Christian Reconquista (reconquest) in 1492, it became the Royal Court of Ferdinand and Isabella.

DSC00748.jpgThe fortress is absolutely enormous and full of buildings with elegant architecture, amazing views of the city, and impressive museums. If you only have time to see one thing while in the city of Granada, it should be El Alhambra.

Overall, Granada was one of the cooler cities I have ever experienced. There was so much to do and so much to see, that I cannot imagine anyone getting bored in this city. If you are ever in Spain, or even Europe, Granada is undoubtedly worth going to.