Arriving In Alicante

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Upon Arriving in Alicante there was a strange sensation of fear mixed with excitement to start my journey. The excitement overshadowed the fear, but the fears of being in a foreign city are quite rational.

For someone like me, who has only taken basic Spanish classes, the most difficult part of being in Spain is communication. It is difficult when no one speaks your primary language, and you suddenly find yourself being a minority. Spanish communication skills take time to develop, but after spending 3 days in Alicante, my language skills have already improved as I continue having basic conversations with individuals around the city.

The other most prominent fear is consistently DSC00565.jpgbeing out of your comfort zone. Everything you are accustomed to seemingly no longer exists. You find yourself in a foreign environment surrounded by an entirely new culture, political system, and overall way of life. It can be overwhelming and sometimes frightening, but the best way to learn and grow as an individual is to put yourself in these situations where nothing is familiar.

The city of Alicante is a beautiful city with very friendly people, delicious food, and a very rich history. On the second day in Alicante, we climbed to the top of El Castilla de Santa Bárbara (which is where I took these photographs). The castle is over one thousand years old and has the best views in Alicante.

In addition to the Castle, I have spent a lot of time at la Playa de Postiguet (or Postiguet Beach). The city is full of possible adventures and sights to see. As I improve my Spanish and become more comfortable, things will hopefully become easier and more familiar. I have a lot of things that I want to do in the next three months, and I will continue writing about them on this blog. The next big step is moving in with my host family that speaks exclusively Spanish.

Types of Coffee in New Zealand/Australia

In New Zealand and Australia when you go to order coffee and you ask for the stereotypical drip coffee you are going to be looked at like you are a crazy person this is because they have different names for their coffee. So without further ado, here is a list of the coffee types in New Zealand and Australia and an explanation for all of them.

Caffè Americano                                                                                                                   You can make this type of coffee quite simply by adding hot water to a shot of espresso coffee.

Café Latte (or Café au lait)

A latte consists steamed (or scalded) milk and a single shot of coffee, you’ll occasionally encounter cafes that don’t understand the difference between this and a flat white.

Cappuccino

The first is a shot of espresso, then a shot of steamed milk, and finally the barista adds a layer of frothed, foamy milk. This final layer can also be toppStarbucks_Flat_White_1-1.jpged with chocolate shavings or powder.

Espresso

To make an espresso, shoot boiling water under high pressure through finely ground up coffee beans and then pour into a tiny mug.

Flat White

The most Aussie coffees available are the long black and the flat white – as both originated in Australia and New Zealand. For a flat white, the steamed milk from the bottom of the jug (which is usually not so frothy, but rather creamy) is poured over a shot of espresso.

Long Black

Hot water is poured into a cup, and then two shots of espresso are poured into the water.

Irish Coffee

This type of coffee is brewed with whiskey, sugar, and a thick layer of cream on the top.

Macchiato (also known as a Piccolo Latte)

A shot of espresso which is then topped off with foamed milk dashed directly into the cup.

Vienna

A vienna is made by adding two shots of particularly strong espresso together before whipped cream is added as a substitute for milk and sugar.

Mochachino

A ‘mocha’ is just a latte with added chocolate powder or syrup, as well as sometimes being topped with whipped cream.

Affogato

A shot of espresso poured over a desert (usually ice cream)