A Guide to Australian English

“Excuse me, do you know where the baking soda is?” The store clerk looked puzzled for a second, but then looked at me, chuckled to himself and said, “Ah, yes. Do you mean bicarbonate soda?”

 

Turns out that there are quite a few differences between American English and Australian English, or at least enough differences to catch you off guard every once in a while.

 

Slang words and dialects are what differentiate regions and countries that use the same language. The English language is widely used throughout the world and is the official language of more than 50 countries. Every country and region that uses the English language sounds at least slightly different.

 

As for English in Australia, it is unique and varies throughout the country. It seems to have more similarities with English in the UK than English in the United States. Moreover, Australians love to abbreviate words.

 

I’ve been in Australia for about 2 months now and still get confused by certain words and phrases. So, here’s a list of the top ten words and phrases used Australia that I hear in conversation almost daily.

 

  1. Uni – “Are you a uni student?” Uni is short for university. Don’t get caught using the word college, because that is the word Australians use when talking about high school.
  2. I Reckon – “It’s been about 30 minutes, I reckon.” I reckon is used in place of the phrase I think. I actually haven’t heard anyone use the phrase I think.
  3. Heaps – “Thanks heaps!” Heaps means a lot.
  4. Rubbish – “Those food scraps are rubbish.” Rubbish is another way of saying trash. Trash and garbage are used from time to time, but rubbish is more common. All trash bins are labeled with the word rubbish.
  5. Biscuit – “Oreos are my favorite biscuit.” As you can guess, biscuit means cookie. Oh and Oreos used to be my favorite biscuit, until I came across Tim Tams here in Aussie.
  6. Aussie/Oz – “Have you spent much time in Aussie?” Australia is more commonly known as Aussie or Oz to the locals. Here in the state of Tasmania, locals say Tassie instead of Tasmania. Note: the “s” sounds like a “z”, hence why Oz is common.
  7. G’day – “G’day, mate!” G’day is used as a greeting in place of other words, like Hey! Howdy! Hello!
  8. Macca’s – “Let’s get a Big Mac from Maccas.” McDonald’s? Mickey D’s? Nope. They call it Macca’s here.
  9. Jumper – “It’s going to be cold today, don’t forget your jumper.” Jumper is used in place of the word sweatshirt or sweater. More recently, I’ve actually heard the word jumper used to describe a person’s jacket, as well.
  10. Arvo – “Let’s meet up at uni on Monday arvo.” Arvo is commonly used in place of the word afternoon. I had no idea what this word meant the first time someone said this to me.

 

There are heaps more words and phrases that I’ve come across in Aussie and there are even more that I haven’t encountered. Thus, I will continue to thumb through my Australian Slang book for the remainder of my time here.

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Step #0 or Where to Start Before You Start Studying Abroad

from one to the other
Left: DU – Right: University of Newcastle

Hey there. My name’s Joshua Weigley and I’m a DU undergrad student studying abroad in my fourth year at the University of Newcastle, Australia. I chose this awesome Foundational program because I’m a beach kid at heart. But enough about me…

I don’t think anyone likes this step. If anyone does they’re likely the same people who enjoy taking frivolous strolls to the DMV and hanging out in a dentist’s waiting area. This is also the only step that will not translate well to other universities. Every study abroad office (if your school even has a devoted office for it) will have its own pedantic processes and paperwork. So my detailed experience with that won’t be the most helpful (unless you also go to DU, in which case let’s chat). But of course there are things everyone will have to do if they want to study at an international university:

Get your passport – like right now. I don’t care if you’re planning to study abroad over a year from now. Track down your birth certificate or social security card or both. Go get a crappy mug shot taken at Walgreens. I did this as my last step and it was awful and stressful and expensive. So do yourself a favor and pay a visit to your friendly neighborhood Department of State Office. And then after 6-8 weeks you can sit and relax with your fancy new blue cardstock book.

Find out how to start – this one sounds weird, but bare with me. I’ve been told that the process I had to go through was actually abnormally easy, and it still took more effort than I would have preferred. Do some research on your university’s website and see if they have any kind of study abroad office or department. Also try the International Studies Department. And then if the information you need like application deadlines, approved international universities, and scholarship options is not readily available, start sending some emails and ask way too many questions. Beyond that, you’ll find that a lot of responsibility is placed on you to make sure you attend required meetings and finish paperwork on your own. But don’t stress out about it too much. These programs are designed so that students actually use them and go abroad.

Pick a destination – the coolest part, but often the hardest. Narrow it down to three or four schools if you can. Scrawl endlessly on loose pieces of paper the pros and cons of each choice. Argue with yourself at 1 am about “where you best see yourself”. And then one day realize that you’re going to have the time of your life regardless of where you go. I chose the University of Newcastle after months of thinking I wanted to go somewhere else. Whatever exhaustive process you need, just choose and don’t look back.

If you want to see my posts right when they come out, check out “A __ Step Guide”

  • Joshua Weigley

DUSA Vlogger: Meet Vincent!

Vincent is a Film major currently studying at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia.   He has been selected as one of our first DUSA video-bloggers (vlogger)!  Here is a quick introduction to Vincent, shortly after his arrival to Brisbane!

You can also check out some of Vincent’s other creative video work on his YouTube channel.