First Week

The first week is no doubt always the most difficult to get through in any situation. You’re out of your element and are needing to adapt to a new lifestyle for the next few months. During that first week I never believed that from that single first day, the rest of the days would fly. It is currently October 16th and it’s been a full month since the program started in September. Midterms have come and gone and the week after this upcoming week, we get a week off of school. I believed that the days would be so long and I would get very homesick. I did get homesick and I still do because I do miss things from the States every now and then and I do miss my old lifestyle and my friends and family and my dog. However, one thing to note, is that you can most definitely have those moments, it’s not a good idea to stay in them because that will not make your trip enjoyable. There are a few ways that I was able to get over the homesickness quickly and those examples are: hanging out with the friends that I have made during this time, going out to eat and finding new hangout spots, taking nice walks around the city and along the river that is nearby, journal, talk to my family. Now that talking to family one can be a hit or a miss depending on mood.

During the first week for me the biggest struggle was remembering the time chance between here in Austria, and back in the United States. Where I am from there is about an 8 hour time change so it was (and still is) difficult to hold back from calling mom first thing in the morning when it’s usually either late at night or early in the morning. Now, another difficulty was just going to school. Usually when you go to Europe from America, you go to take a vacation and not for school so I did not really want to go to school but, I had to and that first week we were fortunate to be able to go to whatever classes we wanted to try out what we wanted before submitting a final form to finalize what classes we wanted to take this semester. I pretty much already knew what I wanted to take therefore I just went to my planned classes already. It was nice to meet my professors (though here they don’t really call themselves our teachers rather than just teachers) and know what their teaching styles are. Something that I definitely appreciate is that they don’t assign a whole lot of homework to do outside of school. It seems that the teachers and staff in this program seem to have an understanding that us students are here to study but also to explore and live life. The work so far has been so much easier and has caused so much less stress than what I was used to. So that definitely be one thing I will miss when it is time to leave!

That first week not much happened. The program organized a few activities for us to do to get to know each other and to get to know the city more, people hung out together and really it was pretty calm and relaxing. The school part was relatively easy to get the hang of the real headache was the bus. I was not used to taking the bus back in the USA so coming here to where the bus is the preferred way of getting around was difficult. Luckily we were provided a monthly bus pass so after we got it stamped we didn’t need to worry about getting bus passes every day and just got on the bus and got off at our stop. However, because pretty much everything is in German, I really did struggle to listen to what was being said over the radio system in the bus. There is an English translation but it’s a bit odd when you’re listening to someone speak in German one second and the next moment English is being spoken so you can’t always hear the English. I had thankfully gotten an Austrian SIM card already so I was able to use my maps and other apps offline with no problem so I did know where to get on the bus and where to get off the bus and pretty much every day there are groups that go to the study center together so I got the hang of things pretty quickly. I wouldn’t say that for the first day though… we almost got on the wrong bus that would have taken us the completely opposite direction had someone not spoken up and told us we were getting on the wrong bus. So, definitely pay attention to which direction the bus is going in!

As for my living situation I am staying in this “dorm” like building. It’s not necessarily called a dorm as there are more than just students living here but it’s not really an apartment either so I really couldn’t tell you what type of building I’m living in. I was put in a single and some others were put in doubles. In the beginning I was a bit upset that I was put in a single because I do remember selecting the double option for when we were filling out and sending back forms and such but I did realize that it was probably better this way because I do like to have my own space and I do like my alone time as much as I like hanging out with others. It just means that I would need to work a bit harder on making connections and making plans with others which I have learned that I am okay with doing. It’s been an adventure to say the least. There’s a shared kitchen on each floor but we all get our own cabinet and small box in the fridge both of which have locks that we have the keys to. The program provided us with pots and pans and cooking stuff after paying a small deposit. I’ll admit that I was a bit too scared to use the kitchen for the first few days of being here so I did spend some of my money on takeout. However, over the weeks of being here I have grown more comfortable using the kitchen and have even met some really nice people while cooking.

Overall, I would say that it is okay to be scared and during the first week or so it’s common. You don’t know many people, you don’t always know the language, everything’s pretty much new so to go from living your life in your home country to living a new life in a new country is completely normal and understandable. I still get scared sometimes! However, for me, I have made some new friends that have made the transition a lot smoother and easier. I do get homesick sometimes still but I really am enjoying my time here in Austria and have learned a lot about the countries history and its people. I am always looking forward to what the day is going to bring me.

That’s it for now!

-Anna

Old City
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Adjusting

It’s never easy adjusting to a new environment. It wasn’t easy for me to adjust living somewhere else in the same country so imagine my shock when I was learning to adjust to living in a whole new country that did not speak the same language as me. It takes time to adjust and it’s not something you can just rush into and even if you could, you shouldn’t. Taking the time you need to get to know your surroundings and new living environment is what can really make or break your experience while being abroad. I’ll admit, it was very difficult for me to go from a country that speaks primarily English to a country that speaks mostly German. I got confused with what all of the signs meant, what the people were talking about, how to answer someone if they tried to talk to me. I didn’t know and to be honest, I still don’t know. One thing I wish I had done before making my way to Austria was taking learning some German more seriously because it definitely would have made my life a whole lot easier!

When I first arrived in Salzburg, I was lucky to have my mom drop me off because there was no way I felt confident to navigate things on my own just yet so, when we arrived we walked around my new home for the next few months and found my living quarters and the study center where all of my classes would be taking place everyday, found my grocery store and some good restaurants to go to. The reason I was doing this was because for me, structure is very important and I like to know where things are before I do them on my own. I learned how to take the bus, how to know where and when to get on and off the bus (a local did end up having to help us out on the exiting part of the bus) and overall just how to live like the locals.

Though the process of adjusting definitely got much easier when my mom left to go back to the States and I needed to get to my living quarters to get my room. After doing so I met up with some of the students that were in my group (some had not yet arrived) and we went on a city tour with one of the programs staff. From there, those who were all on the tour together all managed to get to know each other and after the tour we all went out to dinner together and just learn more about each other and that was when I really knew that I was going to be okay and that things could really only get better from then!

Salzburg