This, That, and the Other Thing – Three Tips for Pre-departure and Arrival Abroad

  1. Bring something special from home to spruce up your room

This may sound a little silly, but it is definitely something I regretted within the first week of being abroad. Whether it is photos, a poster, or even a pillowcase, bring something that can connect you to home and give your room a little personality. You will be glad to have something to distinguish that space as your own and make it feel homier.

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  1. Don’t make any promises… yet

11874120_10203798343993835_192348149_nStarting school abroad is a lot like orientation week as a freshman at college. Everyone is excited to meet each other and explore their new home. But like freshman year, people form friendships fast and soon settle into friendships. For that reason, don’t make any promises to people from home about FaceTiming, writing emails, or even texting. Take advantage of the newness of your study abroad location – get out and explore with new people. Don’t be that person who stays back because you promised someone you would talk at a certain time. Give yourself a chance to settle in and find your place in the new city with new people before you get into a routine of reaching out to people at home. Once you figure out how your schedule works and when you are free, THEN you can figure out a schedule for staying in touch. Don’t feel guilty about being in the moment when you first arrive.

  1. Allow yourself to feel every emotion

The other day I was eating an apple and thought about eating apples at home during the summer, and out of nowhere I started crying. The first week or so abroad can be totally overwhelming. You meet new people every day, you learn the layout of your city and new home, and you are trying to get over jet lag. emoji_autism2All the stimulation keeps you insanely busy, so remember to allow yourself some “me-time.” Give yourself at least 10 minutes a day to reflect on your experience. You could write in a journal, talk with a new friend or roommate, or even just think in silence about the experience so far. Whatever you like best, make sure you give yourself time to feel everything – the highlights like an awesome new friend or a funny experience as well as the things you miss and things that frustrate you about your new home. It is okay not to love every minute of the experience. If it was easy, everyone would be doing it. Let yourself feel every part of the experience so you can grow from them.

 

 

 

  • Emily Wolverton

Anticipating Abroad: Hopes, Fears, and Goals

In the two years I have been at the University of Denver, I have found that it is not uncommon for my peers to be remarkably well-traveled. In addition, as DU was recently ranked the #1 school in the country for study abroad, I never hear my peers asking each other if they are studying abroad, but rather where they are studying abroad. I am Emily Wolverton, and this fall I will be studying at the Danish Institute for Study Abroad (DIS) in Copenhagen, Denmark. I narrowed down my destination options with two main criteria: classes taught in English and a program that provided interesting pre-medicine classes. I ultimately decided on DIS in Copenhagen because it met those criteria and includes experiential learning opportunities, has a strong student support system, and integrates travel into the semester via class study tours and independent travel breaks. Frankly, I am terrified for all that is to come. However despite my fears, I am also ecstatic to get the opportunity to learn about a new culture in depth for four months.

My biggest fear stems from my inexperience traveling independently. I love traveling with my family and have taken a few trips with groups of students since attending DU, but never have I set off completely on my own for a foreign country with no companions. I am anxious but also excited to be pushed out of my comfort zone and forced into independence. I rarely go home during the school year at DU, but there is something intimidating about knowing there is an ocean between my family and friends and me, so I couldn’t go home if I wanted.

Another fear is that I won’t achieve the level of cultural immersion for which I am hoping. DIS is a school geared completely toward students (mostly from the U.S.) who are studying abroad. It is an English-speaking school with a lot of support, which is comforting but also a little disappointing. I do not know a word of Danish and will only be taking a beginner language and culture course, so I worry I will not be able to connect with the Danes closely due to this language barrier and the physical separation I anticipate within the school.

bookphotoA third fear I have is that I will get too caught up in my school work to enjoy the fact that I am in a beautiful and unique foreign country. I am looking forward to all of the classes I am registered for, but am worried I will become a little too engrossed in my studies. I want to explore Scandinavia and Europe as a whole, but my education has always been my first priority. I am afraid this personality trait may limit my enjoyment and appreciation of the time I have abroad because I will be so focused doing well in my classes.

Now that I have made studying abroad sound scary and somewhat undesirable, I want to explain some of my hopes and goals for my experience as they are the things that occupy my mind most often as I look forward to the coming semester. My biggest hope is to build lasting relationships. I love exploring and going on adventures, but those experiences are always made better by having people with whom to share them. There are two separate week-long breaks set aside during the semester to allow students to travel, so I hope to find friends with whom I can explore Copenhagen, Scandinavia, and even Europe.

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This is a famous canal in Copenhagen which I cannot wait to see for myself.

I not only want to get to know my peers and professors, but I also hope to get to know people from Denmark so I may develop a better understanding and appreciation for the country and culture. My goal is for these relationships to remove me from “tourist” status to become a true temporary resident. I hope to really know Copenhagen and feel like it is a second home to me. One thing I think will help me connect best to Copenhagen is working hard to understand the culture and language which is why another goal of mine is to be able to listen to people speaking in Danish and understand the gist of the conversation. Additionally, I hope to be able to go out to eat and order a meal (correctly) in Danish.

One major reason I applied to DIS was the number of outstanding experiential learning opportunities it provides for its students. The classes I have taken for my major in biology and for the pre-med track have undoubtedly been necessary as a foundation for my future education. I have high hopes, however, for the specific medicine-based courses I will be taking in Copenhagen which are accompanied by multiple experiential learning adventures. In my main course, I get to learn how to suture, insert an IV, and more. My goal is to master these skills as they appeal to my interests and are applicable to my career aspirations. The clinical approach to the science of medicine is the root of my interest so I cannot wait to learn how to “write a structured medical report,” and “explain the rationale for choice of tests and treatments in clinical practice,” both of which are course objectives for my main class. My goal in these classes is to excel and to master the skills and knowledge with which I am presented. I chose an academically rigorous program because I love my major and am excited for a future in medicine, so I hope to do well in these classes and affirm my love for the medical field.

Another hope I have (although it is also a fear) is to realize what I am capable of when I am out on my own. I expect to be out of my comfort zone often, but I am excited to gain some independence and develop socially and culturally. I hope to embrace a new lifestyle while abroad and to gain a more worldly perspective.